What to Look for If You Think Your or a Loved One Has Cancer

Early detection can be a huge advantage for successful cancer treatment. Do you think you or a loved one may be suffering from cancer? Here are some of the primary signs and symptoms to watch for.

Difference Between Signs and Symptoms

While they may seem like the same thing, there is an important difference between signs and symptoms.

*Signs are measurable conditions, such as a fever, that can be observed by another person.

*Symptoms are detectable only by the person who is actually experiencing them. Pain and fatigue fall into this category.

Keep in mind that many signs and symptoms may be temporary and caused by something other than cancer. Be sure to consult a doctor if these conditions become exacerbated or don’t go away over time.

Possible Signs and Symptoms of Cancer

*Fatigue or tiredness that is not relieved by rest

*Significant weight loss or gain (10+ pounds) with no apparent cause

*Eating and digestive problems, including lack of appetite, stomach pain, nausea and vomiting or constipation, diarrhea or other changes in bowel habits

*Swelling, thickening or lumps in the breast or any part of the body

*Sudden unexplained pain that becomes more serious or continues to linger

*Changes in skin features, such as a new mole or altered appearance in an existing one, a sore that refuses to heal or a yellowish color in skin or eyes

*Chronic coughing and hoarseness

*Bleeding or bruising that appears suddenly without reason

*Pain or blood in the urine, or increase or decrease in frequency of urination

*Fever or night sweats

*Headaches

*Vision or hearing problems

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With our state-of-the-art immunotherapy cancer treatment, even many patients with advanced cancer have achieved long-term remission. Contact us to see how Issels® can help you or your loved one.

Tips On Healthy Living From American Cancer Society

How proactive are you about your health? According to the American Cancer Society, the healthy living tips recommended for patients undergoing cancer treatment can also reduce the risk of developing cancer in the first place.

Good Nutrition and Physical Activity Can Reduce Cancer Risk

According to the World Cancer Research Fund, approximately 20 percent of cancer cases in the United States are connected to poor health habits, including obesity, excessive alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and lack of nutrition.

Here’s a look at how you can start today to reduce your personal cancer risk.

1. Maintain a Healthy Weight

Excess weight puts hormones such as estrogen and insulin into overdrive, which can promote development of tumors. In addition to reducing cancer risk, maintaining a healthy weight prevents or controls diabetes, cardiovascular disease and other issues.

2. Be Physically Active

Exercise involves physical activity performed at a moderate or vigorous intensity. This can include gardening, walking and biking as well as more traditional forms such as sports and weight lifting. Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity every week.

3. Follow a Nutritious Diet

– Avoid processed foods.

– Eat at least 2-1/2 cups of fruits and vegetables daily.

– Choose foods that are low in fat, sugar and calories.

– Cut back or eliminate refined carbohydrates in favor of whole-grain products.

– Eat smaller portions.

– Limit your intake of alcohol.

Integrative Cancer Treatment at Issels®

At Issels®, our personally tailored cancer treatment programs combine a number of complementary elements. Contact us to learn why we are the leader in non-toxic, state-of-the-art immunotherapy cancer treatment.

You Must Take Care of Yourself While Caring for a Cancer Patient

When you’re caring for a loved one who is undergoing cancer treatment, it’s easy to put them first while losing sight of your own needs. While that feeling is understandable, taking care of yourself benefits both you and the patient.

What Is a Caregiver?

Many cancer patients receive treatment on an outpatient basis, meaning they still spend significant portions of time at home. “Caregiver” is generally used to refer to an unpaid friend or family member who tends to a patient’s day-to-day needs.

Caregiving can include anything from feeding, dressing and bathing a patient to providing transportation, handling finances and attending cancer treatment appointments. For many people, these duties are over and above the needs of themselves and other family members they may be responsible for.

Tips for Self-Care 

Caring for a cancer patient can be deeply fulfilling, but it may also be physically, mentally and emotionally draining. Here are some helpful ways to maintain your energy and spirits.

*Be sure to schedule time for personal activities you enjoy. This could include lunch with a friend, reading a good book or taking a walk.

*Don’t be afraid to seek support. There are a number of peer groups for caregivers, as well as counselors who specialize in this issue. If you’re religious or spiritual, this can be another avenue for support.

*Ask other friends and family members for help when the load gets to be too much. It’s neither feasible nor advisable to handle everything on your own.

*Keep up your strength and morale by eating a healthy diet. Plan regular meals with balanced nutrition.

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At Issels®, we understand that cancer treatment involves more than just fighting the tumor. Contact us to learn more about our individual immunotherapy protocols and read patient testimonials.

Should Genetic Testing For Cancer Be Expanded?

Lifestyle choices, such as smoking and poor diet, can affect your chances of developing cancer, but some people carry a high risk for the disease in their DNA. The medical community is currently debating whether widespread genetic testing will do more harm than good.

Would Lower-Cost Tests Mean Greater Accessibility?

BRCA-related cancers occur when the genes that produce tumor-preventing proteins mutate to the point where they lose that ability. These genetic changes result in higher risk of breast, prostate, ovarian and pancreatic cancers as well as melanoma.

Testing can normally run into thousands of dollars, making it generally available only via insurance coverage to individuals with a strong family history of cancer. But biotech companies have come up with viable tests that cost less than $500.

When Knowledge is a Dangerous Thing

Experts such as Mary-Claire King, the award-winning geneticist who originally identified the BRCA1 gene, think that the new testing methods should be considered routine like Pap smears and mammograms. Others are not convinced.

Why is caution needed with the new genetic testing?

• Genetics is not a cut-and-dried specialty, and not all variations can be interpreted correctly.

• Some companies sell these tests directly to consumers without clear information about limitations and risks.

At this point, knowing your family history is still the best indicator of a possible genetic link to cancer.

Genomic Testing and Immunotherapy for Cancer

At Issels®, our immunotherapy for cancer treatments are personally developed to allow for individual factors such as genetic predisposition and lifestyle. Visit our website to learn more about our state-of-the-art protocols.

Chemicals Found in Leafy Greens May Prevent Colon Cancer

The number of colon cancer cases in the U.S. has been on the rise, especially among younger adults. Since effective cancer treatment for this disease can be hard to achieve, scientists are looking for better ways to prevent colon cancer. Vegetables might prove to be one way to reduce the risk of this disease.

Vegetable Chemicals and Gut Health

Researchers conducting a study on mice found that chemicals in certain vegetables, such as broccoli and cabbage, might play a key role in preventing colon cancer. These chemicals were found that help reduce the risk of gut inflammation and the development of colon cancer in mice.

The mice in this study were genetically modified and unable to naturally produce a certain protein that guards against gut inflammation. Scientists fed these mice vegetables containing chemicals needed to produce this protein and found that they did not develop colon cancer. The mice that were not fed these vegetables did not have this same protection and readily developed gut inflammation and colon cancer.

Colon Cancer Prevention in Humans

While the results of this study offer some hope, it’s important to keep in mind that they worked on mice. Further studies are needed to determine if the same results are found in humans. However, eating vegetables in general is considered a good way to boost your health and well-being.

Some studies have found that vegetables appear to offer protection against cancer in humans. Eating a healthy diet that includes these vegetables while also avoiding unhealthy foods may help reduce the risk of colon cancer and other cancers.

If you’re exploring cancer treatment options for colon cancer or other forms of cancer, please contact Issels® today. We can provide details on our immunotherapy modalities that are used to treat different kinds of cancer.

Can Work and Cancer Treatment Coexist?

If you’re diagnosed with cancer, one of your immediate concerns is how it will affect your everyday life, including your job. Can you continue to work while in treatment, or will you even be able to keep your position?

Can Work and Cancer Treatment Co-Exist?

No matter what form of cancer you have, your particular case is unique so there are no hard and fast rules concerning your job performance. Answers will depend on factors such as your overall health, stage of cancer, and your duties.

Go At Your Own Pace

You may find that you’re able to continue with your regular work schedule during immunotherapy for cancer or other treatments. If your job becomes too much of a strain or your doctor recommends that you cut back, here are some tips to help you manage:

• Change to a part-time schedule

• Work from home either full- or part-time

• Modify your working conditions, such as having a desk closer to the restroom

• Enlist help from your family with household chores so you have more energy for your work responsibilities

You’ll need to coordinate any modifications with your supervisor, so be sure to communicate with him/her regularly. As for co-workers, it’s your choice whom you tell and how much you tell them. You may want to discuss your illness only with your closest and most trusted co-workers.

Immunotherapy for Cancer: Individually Tailored for Your Specific Case

Immunotherapy for cancer includes personalized non-toxic therapies that can reduce the number and severity of side effects. Contact us to learn why Issels® is the leader in comprehensive immunotherapy for cancer protocols.

Individualized Cancer Treatment